© 2023 by the Vermont Wild & Scenic River Committee | All Rights Reserved

WSFF On Tour Logo, lt green.png
November 30, 2019
5:30 - 9pm
Clips & Reels Theater
Jay Peak Resort
Advance tickets $13*

Limited availability - don't miss out!

Reserve your seat today.

Films  -  Raffle  -  Food & Drink  ---  Join us for the fun!

Visit our Facebook Event page  for updates and announcements! 

*day-of tickets $15

(plus fees)

Check out the great selection of films that we will be showing on November 30th!

2019 Film Program

Blue​ - 

Fresh off training wheels, a four-year-old growing up in Valdez, Alaska begins to push her boundaries and explore what's possible on her bike, her eyes naturally drifting to the mountains. We dive into the world of her fantasy and explore the mountains, glaciers, and rivers of Valdez by fat bike with a crew of boundary-pushing female athletes hailing from Alaska and beyond. Blue is a fantastical journey into a young girl's imagination and a testament to the inherent creativity, innovation, and strength forged in women of the north.

Your Rivers Need You -

The Red River in Kentucky was slated to be dammed in the early 60s and young landowner Joe Bowen supported it. He even gave the speech in favor of the dam against Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas and the Sierra Club. Not anymore. “In 75 years of living, I’ve changed my attitude about this wild river. The river is ours. So if it’s ours, then it’s also our responsibility. I want my great-grandchildren to see what I have seen.” In 1993, the Red River received Wild & Scenic River Designation. 

Great Old Broads for Wolves -

Welcome to the southwest, where the land is wild and the women...might be even wilder. Introducing the Great Old Broads for Wilderness and their fight to keep southwestern Colorado's wilderness an intact and natural environment. These women have come together to find their voice, and now are using it to give these lands a fighting chance.

The Last Green Thread - 

Amidst the backdrop of massive development and population growth, three friends embark on a journey through the Everglades Headwaters in Florida to survey a fragile wilderness corridor before it disappears forever.

Adventure Not War - 

U.S. veterans Stacey Bare, Robin Brown, and Matthew Griffin travel back into the mountains of Iraq on a mission to heal wounds and experience the country and its culture without the shadow of war. Adventure Not War reveals a seldom seen beautiful underbelly in a place of devastation and creates space for healing wounds deeper than flesh and bones.

March of the Newts - 

Follow one of the forest's funkiest creatures into a gangly gathering of amphibious affection... and learn how you can help protect these sensitive animals from an emerging disease.

Greenland Melts - 

Dr. Konrad Steffen, the Swiss climate scientist whose research propelled Al Gore's "An Inconvenient Truth" and "An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power", reveals his alarming findings around glacial melt impacts on global sea level rise, climate change, and mass migration. Greenland Melts is stunningly filmed at remote polar monitoring stations where Dr. Steffen has been tracking the melting of the Greenlandic Ice Sheet for over 25 years.

Mexican Fishing Bats - 

When the sun sets over the Sea of Cortez, a tiny bat weighing about as much as five nickels emerges from the boulder-covered hillsides on Isla Partida and heads out to sea. And night, according to Hurme, “is when the magic happens.” All night, the bats swoop across the sea surface, snagging fish that still elude capture by the researchers despite their boats, nets, and high-tech gear. This video follows Hurme and his team in action, as they untangle the mystery of how these endangered bats find their prey.

Run Wild Run Free: 50 Year of Wild and Scenic Rivers - 

The Red River in Kentucky was slated to be dammed in the early 60s and young landowner Joe Bowen supported it. He even gave the speech in favor of the dam against Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas and the Sierra Club. Not anymore. “In 75 years of living, I’ve changed my attitude about this wild river. The river is ours. So if it’s ours, then it’s also our responsibility. I want my great-grandchildren to see what I have seen.” In 1993, the Red River received Wild & Scenic River Designation.